Mental Discipline

March 23rd, 2015 | Posted by Dawn Bertuca in Garden | Living On Purpose | Photos - (Comments Off on Mental Discipline)

Sometimes you just have to stop the negative thoughts and replace them with positive thoughts. Am I right? That’s why, even though it’s March 23 and we just got four inches of new snow, I’m refusing to photograph it. Instead, I’m posting pictures of these hyacinths. Yes, they’re forced blooms, but their perfume fills the entire first floor of my house. It may be winter on the outside, but it’s spring on the inside.

A photo posted by @dawnann12 on

Bite it!

If you asked your kids “where does food come from,” what would they say? Costco? McDonalds? The Grocery Fairy? 

With the busy lifestyle many of us lead, it wouldn’t be far-fetched for kids to grow up thinking that everything they eat comes out of a plastic package. The trouble is, the overwhelming selection of “convenient” food options available to today’s kids can make healthy whole foods seem less appealing. If you share my goal of helping your kids learn to select healthy foods. then you want them to know where “real” foods come from. If they can see, touch, and learn about whole foods and have fun doing it, they just might (someday) choose to put healthier foods in their bodies!

So, nourish your kids and your parent-child relationship with these five tips for helping kids connect to their food:

1. Visit a farmers market. What a perfect time of year to see the bounty of the harvest! Take a walk through your local farmers market and let kids see, smell, touch and taste some real food. Many times you can talk directly to the farmer who grew the food. Find your local farmers market here.

2. Get out in the garden – it’s not too late. If you didn’t plant a garden this summer, it’s actually not too late in many areas to plant cold-weather crops such as kale or spinach and watch your food grow.Visit your local nursery or garden center to find out which plants can still be grown in your area. Many urban areas also have community gardens where you can take a tour or volunteer to do a little gardening work. Check the directory here to see if there’s one in your neighborhood.

3. Trace your grapes. As I mentioned in my previous post, there are some fun tech tools you can use to trace your food back to the farm. Check out the HarvestMark app and website to find out where to get produce you can scan and trace. In addition, RealTimeFarms.com is a “crowd-sourced nationwide food guide” that lets you trace your food back to the farm or, conversely, find healthy food produced and sold locally. Tip: try searching “pumpkins,” then go buy them at the farm! You might be surprised at the local farms you didn’t know existed.

4. Visit a CSA or farm. Over the summer my family visited Critter Barn, a working educational farm in Zeeland, Michigan. The kids got up close and personal with the animals, and our 13-year-old guide gave us a great tour, explaining about egg production, sheep shearing, and many other aspects of farming with animals.  Beyond the fun of being able to walk a goat, brush a bunny, and pet a turkey, it was a realistic and eye-opening look at the responsibility that comes with eating animal products. I highly recommend it!

In addition, many community-supported agriculture (CSA) farms encourage visitors or host volunteer work days. This ia great way to get first-hand understanding of where food comes from.There are even farms that will come to you! Check out the wonderful work of Truck Farm Chicago – a mobile educational unit that brings the growing farm to your kids.

5. Cook with your kids. Even if they won’t eat those vegetables (like one of my kids), take them into the kitchen and show them how to clean, chop and cook those veggies. They might sneak a taste when you’re not looking!  For ideas, check out the kid-friendly and healthy recipes on Letsmove.gov

Deepening your kids’ understanding of food is truly rewarding. Not only are you helping fulfill a basic need for survival, you’re also laying the groundwork for health and growth. Ideally, your kids will learn to make healthier food choices by feeling more connected to their food. Have some fun with food this fall!

I’d love to hear anything you’ve tried to get your kids more involved with cooking and eating healthy. Say hello in the comments!