Heads Up: It’s Millennium Park’s 10th Birthday!

June 18th, 2014 | Posted by Dawn Bertuca in Chicago | Conscious Parenting | Fun | Travel - (Comments Off on Heads Up: It’s Millennium Park’s 10th Birthday!)

Visiting Chicago this summer? Or do you live here, like me, and need a good “staycation” idea? A day (or half day) exploring Millennium Park is a great choice for a laid-back, free-to-cheap, kid-friendly excursion. If you haven’t taken your kids to explore this downtown oasis, now is the time. Millennium Park is celebrating its tenth anniversary, and the city is planning plenty of extra activities. The giant “head” sculpture below (one of four) is part of a new art installation by Jaume Plensa commemorating the anniversary. It’s so serene; I loved it. The free public art—from the stunning Pritzker Pavillion to the iconic Cloud Gate—as well as free cultural activities, are what make Millennium Park such a community jewel.

There’s plenty to do, from strolling the Lurie Gardens to cooling off in Crown Fountain. You can snag a free guided tour or simply wander.  Catch a concert at the pavillion; take your picture reflected in “the Bean.” Pack a picnic lunch or just grab a Lemon Chill on the Chase Promenade. It’s all good. Get the specifics on all these suggestions in my “Do Millennium Park” list on Raved Mobile!  I’d love to hear your suggestions as well.

What’s your favorite thing to do in Millennium Park? Tell me in the comments!

Kids’ Summer Chores: What Works!

July 22nd, 2013 | Posted by Dawn Bertuca in Conscious Parenting | Good Ideas - (Comments Off on Kids’ Summer Chores: What Works!)

Well, it’s mid-July, and for many of us that means four to six more weeks of kids home from school.  By now you know whether your summer routine is “working” or not. You’re either blissfully enjoying the rewards of the season with your offspring, or grimly counting down the days until school starts. Or probably, like me, you’re somewhere in between.Untitled

I think most parents want their kids to have a great summer. And by “great,” we don’t mean “sitting in the house playing video games and watching the Disney Channel 24/7.” No, we envision some sort of ideal, fulfilling summer involving bicycles, lemonade stands, tennis, beaches, roasted marshmallows and sidewalk chalk. Well, the problem with this vision is that it doesn’t just become reality all by itself.  You, the parent, need to help it along a little, while still going to work (inside or outside the home), folding laundry and getting meals on the table. Enter the summer routine (sometimes known as a chore chart). Nobody likes to be a taskmaster, but we all can benefit from a little structure. Or as I like to say, “Get your chores done so you can have fun!”

Since my kids were little, I’ve had some sort of summer routine for them to follow. Our summer routine has evolved as the kids got older and I discovered what worked and didn’t. I’ve generally used chore charts throughout the year as well, with limited success. Kids hate chores, right? Not (so much) anymore! This summer seems to be the best ever for us, and I wanted to share what’s working. I’d really love to hear what’s working for you, too!

What’s On the Chart?

Screen Shot 2013-07-22 at 1.37.59 PMAlthough I already had an existing summer routine chart that I simply tweaked to reflect some new ideas, those tweaks made all the difference! I credit the Power of Moms “Summer Camp Kit” with the inspiration for this year’s summer routine. Their idea of having “must-do” activity categories was a breakthrough for me!  Definitely check it out, purchase their kit, and save yourself a lot of work. Here are my kids’ must-do activities for each day: Bible time, 5-10 minutes; wash, brush teeth, and get dressed; feed the dog (either a.m. or p.m.); dispose of clean and dirty laundry in their rooms; pick up their stuff around the house, tidy their rooms (twice a week), contribute to the household (see “choice” below); do a mealtime chore; play with the dog 30 minutes (alternating days); be active outside for 30 minutes; practice something (see “choice” below); and read 30 minutes.  The rest of the day is free to hang with friends, go to the pool, whatever.

What’s Working This Year

Unlike previous years’ charts, this year’s chart is actually getting used, without much complaint. Here’s what I think is working:

Screen Limits The first summer rule we ever had was “No TV Before 3” (meaning 3:00 p.m.).  I figured that was a good way to get the kids involved with something else before the TV monster took over. Many days, once they got started with something fun, they never even wanted to turn on the TV. Now, we still have the 3:00 rule, but we have to say “no screens” to encompass iPods, computers, etc. If screens are involved in a kids’ project, as they so often are these days, then we make an exception to the rule. However, charts must be done before screens can be used.

Choice Choice! What a concept! Let your child choose how he or she contributes to the household. This works so well, I can’t even believe it. Our charts say, “Contribute to the household.” On the back, this is explained: “Do a substantial and needed chore such as: take out the garbage, fold a load of laundry, sweep the kitchen floor, (the list goes on).” The only requirement is that it must be a needed chore. In other words, if the garbage doesn’t need to be taken out, you can’t use that as your contribution for the day. Mealtime chores are similar, just related to mealtime (empty dishwasher, wipe down table, etc.). For “practice something,” kids just need to work at and get better at something, whether it’s juggling, piano, algebra, dance, Spanish, or baseball. With choices, kids can’t get tired of doing the same thing every day or claim to hate a particular activity. After all, it’s their choice!

Earning Potential First of all, I am a firm believer that rewards don’t work. I’d much rather have my kids be intrinsically motivated to do things. However, earning some spending cash is a pretty good motivator! Earning money is a real-world skill and that’s part of the point of doing these summer chores. In summers past, I had an all-or-nothing philosophy. Kids had to complete their entire chart to earn their weekly allowance. Well, that was a dismal failure. I guess the concept of having to check every box was overwhelming. And, life does sometimes get in the way. So this year, we are going with a pay-per-square approach. Each square they check off is worth 15 cents. That doesn’t sound like much, but it can add up to around $10 a week if everything is completed, plus a bonus for a completed chart. It’s working: My kids are actually volunteering to do chores, and that is music to my ears.

What About the Fun Part?

I highly recommend putting some structure to the fun part of your summer, too. There are many lists on the internet of fun summer activities. I have captured several of them on my Pinterest page. I’d love to hear all of your suggestions, comments, and feedback. Please leave a comment!